Anthrax Protective Antigen (PA) IgG ELISA (GWB-BQK1D4)

GWB-BQK1D4

BQ 024G

1x96 well plate
$677.60

Description

DescriptionThe Anthrax protective antigen (PA) IgG ELISA is intended for use in the evaluation of patient's immune status or exposure to Anthrax. ELISA test for the detection of IgG antibody to Anthrax Protective Antigen (PA) can be used to study the efficacy of experimental anthrax vaccine and the exposure to this antigen. Because B. anthracis has a high probability for use as an agent in biologic terrorism, many centers are involved in studying the epidemiological and laboratory diagnostic of this bacterium. Human anthrax has three major clinical forms: cutaneous, inhalation, and gastrointestinal. Cutaneous anthrax is a result of introduction of the spore through the skin; inhalation anthrax, through the respiratory tract; and gastrointestinal anthrax, by ingestion. In the United States, incidence of naturally acquired anthrax is extremely low. Gastrointestinal anthrax is rare but may occur as explosive outbreaks associated with ingestion of infected animals. Worldwide, the incidence is unknown, though B. anthracis is present in most of the world. If untreated, anthrax in all forms can lead to septicemia and death. Early treatment of cutaneous anthrax is usually curative, and early treatment of all forms is important for recovery.
SpeciesHuman
Sample TypeSerum

Additional Information

Name Anthrax Protective Antigen (PA) IgG ELISA (GWB-BQK1D4)
Short Description The Anthrax protective antigen (PA) IgG ELISA is intended for use in the evaluation of patient's immune status or exposure to Anthrax. ELISA test for the detection of IgG antibody to Anthrax Protective Antigen (PA) can be used to study the efficacy of experimental anthrax vaccine and the exposure to this antigen. Because B. anthracis has a high probability for use as an agent in biologic terrorism, many centers are involved in studying the epidemiological and laboratory diagnostic of this bacterium. Human anthrax has three major clinical forms: cutaneous, inhalation, and gastrointestinal. Cutaneous anthrax is a result of introduction of the spore through the skin; inhalation anthrax, through the respiratory tract; and gastrointestinal anthrax, by ingestion. In the United States, incidence of naturally acquired anthrax is extremely low. Gastrointestinal anthrax is rare but may occur as explosive outbreaks associated with ingestion of infected animals. Worldwide, the incidence is unknown, though B. anthracis is present in most of the world. If untreated, anthrax in all forms can lead to septicemia and death. Early treatment of cutaneous anthrax is usually curative, and early treatment of all forms is important for recovery.
Reactivity Human
Datasheets/Manuals Printable datasheet for GWB-BQK1D4